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In Stock
Ophiuchus (Galotta, Syrah, Merlot, Divico)
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Ophiuchus (Galotta, Syrah, Merlot, Divico)

AOC Valais, Didier Joris, 2018

750 ml
Grape variety: Galotta, Syrah, Merlot, Divico
Producer: Didier Joris
Origin: Switzerland / Wallis
Other vintages:
In stock
Article nr. 30154718
Grape variety: Galotta, Syrah, Merlot, Divico
Producer: Didier Joris
Origin: Switzerland / Wallis
Other vintages:

Description

Deep colour with dark accents. On the nose, a pleasant sensation of green pepper, blackcurrant, black pepper and tobacco. Muscular, powerful body with a pronounced but fine-grained tannic structure. The length and the classicism of this wine are reminiscent of a beautiful Cru Classé Saint-Julien Bordeaux.

Attributes

Origin: Switzerland / Wallis
Grape variety: Galotta, Syrah, Merlot, Divico
Maturity: 2 to 8 years
Serving temperature: 16 to 18 °C
Drinking suggestion: Châteaubriand, Filet Wellington, Saddle of lamb fillet with herb jus, Roasted lamb gigot, Roast saddle of venison, Bistecca fiorentina, T-Bone steak, Wild fowl
Vinification: fully destemmed, long must fermentation
Harvest: hand-picking
Maturation: in partly new and used barriques/ Pièces, short cultivation
Bottling: filtration
Maturation duration: 7 months
Volume: 12.5 %
Countries

Switzerland

Switzerland – A small country with enormous diversity

Switzerland is famous for its banks, watches, and cheese, but not necessarily for its wine. The Swiss didn't invent wine, but they have been extremely open and curious to it. Wine culture arrived in what is now modern Switzerland via several routes: from Marseilles to Lake Geneva and the Lower Valais region; from the Aosta Valley through the Great St. Bernard Pass to the rest of Valais; from the Rhone through Burgundy, across the Jura Mountains to Lake Constance; and from Lombardy to Ticino, and then on to Grisons.

Regions

Wallis

Valais: Alpine wines with class

More than 20 varieties of grapes can yield wines in Valais that are full of character. A large number of them grow on spectacular, steep slopes. Sealed off by mighty chains of mountains, old plantings like Petite Arvine, Amigne and Cornalin have survived in Valais, and today they are highly sought-after by wine enthusiasts. The highest vineyards in Europe are also found in Valais: the Savignin vines (known here as “Heida”), rooted in the mountain community of Visperterminen.

Grape varieties

Merlot

Everybody’s darling

Merlot is the most charming member of the Bordeaux family. It shines with rich colour, fragrant fullness, velvety tannins and sweet, plummy fruit. It even makes itself easy for the vintner, as it matures without issue in cool years as well. This is in contrast to the stricter Cabernet Sauvignon, which it complements as a blending partner. Its good qualities have made the Merlot famous worldwide. At over 100,000 hectares, it is the most-planted grape in France. It also covers large areas in California, Italy, Australia and recently in Eastern Europe. The only catch is that pure Merlot varieties rarely turn out well. Its charm is often associated with a lack of substance. Only the best specimens improve with maturity. They then develop complex notes of leather and truffles. This succeeds in the top wines from the Bordeaux appellation of Pomerol and those from Ticino, among others.

Syrah

A hint of pepper

The legend stubbornly persists that the Syrah variety came from the Persian city of Shiraz. Yet, researchers have shown that it is a natural crossing of two old French varieties: the red Dureza from the Rhône Valley and the white Mondeuse blanche from Savoy. Wines from Syrah are gentle and concentrated. They smell of dark berries, violets and liquorice, and amaze with a piquant touch of white pepper. As varietal wines, they are found on the northern Rhone, as in the Hermitage or Côte Rôtie appellations, as well as in Swiss Valais. In the southern Rhône Valley, Syrah is often wedded with Grenache and Mourvèdre. In 1832, a Frenchman brought the variety to Australia, where it became the emblem of the national wine industry. There, the weightiest versions develop with typical notes of tar and chocolate.