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Baur au Lac Vins
Adlikerstrasse 272
8105 Regensdorf, CH
+41 44 777 05 05,
information@balv.ch

Australia

Australia – A rapid rise to the international elite.

Australia, separated from the other continents by oceans for roughly 50 million years, has almost two hundred years of viticulture history. For a long time, Australians pressed their wines for their own use, with simple, undemanding vines. But later the country began to specialize in classic, European varieties. And with great success –Australian wines today enjoy great prestige and are consumed worldwide..

White wines from Australia

In Stock
Bin 311 Chardonnay
Only 6 Bottles

Bin 311 Chardonnay

Tumbarumba, Penfolds, 2015, 750 ml
CHF 34.90
In Stock
Chardonnay Kangarilla Road
Vegan
In Stock

The Surly Muse

Barossa Valley, Massena, 2013, 750 ml
CHF 19.–

Red wines from Australia

In Stock
Wine Spectator 94 Points
Bin 707, Cabernet Sauvignon
Only 2 Bottles

Bin 707, Cabernet Sauvignon

Penfolds, 2014, 750 ml
CHF 464.–
In Stock
Wine Spectator 94 Points
Bin 707, Cabernet Sauvignon
Only 5 Bottles

Bin 707, Cabernet Sauvignon

Penfolds, 2015, 750 ml
CHF 464.–
In Stock
Bin 95 Grange
Only 9 Bottles

Bin 95 Grange

South Australia, Penfolds, 1996, 750 ml
CHF 490.–
In Stock

Black Guts

Barossa Valley, Rusden, 2010, 750 ml
CHF 69.50

In 1788, an English ship with 300 convicts anchored in Sydney Harbor. The captain, Arthur Phillip, noted that winegrowing could be developed almost to perfection in such a favorable climate. Thus they immediately began planting the vines they had brought. Later, South African settlers also brought vines with them, which thrived marvelously.

The Scotsman James Busby (1802-1871) is considered the “father of the Australian wine industry.” Busby acquired a vast knowledge of wine in France, and founded his own winery north of Sydney in the Hunter River Valley. After a visit to Europe in 1833, he brought with him hundreds of seedlings of various vine varieties, including the red Syrah, which later became famous in its new home as Shiraz.

At the time of the Australian gold rush around 1850, wine was a popular elixir for prospectors, but was also enjoyed by the rest of the population. This may explain why, with the exception of the Northern Territory, wine is grown today in every Australian state.

Abundant opportunity

Drought is the biggest problem for Australian winemakers, and in many areas the vineyards depend on artificial irrigation.

For this reason, wine production has moved from the hot north to the cooler south in recent decades. The so-called cool climate areas are located in the west (Margaret River, Frankland, and Mount Barker), south (Adelaide Hills, Eden Valley, Coonawarra, and McLaren Vale), and southeast (Geelong, Yarra Valley, and Alpine Valleys).

The fresh, fruity, and light wines from these areas have significantly contributed to Australian wine’s international status.

Loved across the world

At over 400 million liters per year, Australia exports the fourth-largest amount of wine in the world. Another 400 million liters stay in the country for domestic consumption.

Australia exports to the whole world, but the main buyers, by a wide margin, are the United Kingdom and United States.

Countries

Spain

Spain

Spain – Variety and perfection

Read more
Argentina

Argentina

Where nostalgia tangoes with innovation

Read more
Germany

Germany

Germany – Into the elite the hard way

Read more